Layered Parsnip Cake

Incidentally, parsnips, the carrot’s blonde cousins, work similarly too for making an entirely clammy cake. This one is both veggie lover and sans gluten, made with supplement-rich buckwheat and millet flours, and finished off with candy-coated kumquats.

Ingredients

Candied Kumquats
Vegan Cream Cheese Frosting
Parsnip Cake

Directions

Make the Candied Kumquat
  • In a small to medium saucepan, combine honey with water, vanilla seeds, and pod, and bring to a gentle boil. Add kumquats, lower the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Let cool and keep the kumquats in the syrup. Refrigerate if not using the same day.

Make the Frosting
  • Refrigerate the can of full-fat coconut milk overnight. The fat and water will separate, and the fat will accumulate on top. Carefully scoop it out and combine it with the rest of the ingredients in a medium-sized mixing bowl. Beat with a hand mixer until well-combined and fluffy. Keep refrigerated while baking the cake.

Make the Cake
  • Preheat the oven to 350°. Bring almond milk to a boil and mix it with ground chia in a large mixing bowl. Let the mixture sit for about 5 minutes. Combine all the flours, baking powder, soda, salt, and spices in a mixing bowl. Set aside.

  • Add sugar to the milk-chia mixture and mix using a hand mixer. Add olive oil and vanilla extract, then orange zest and juice. Combine thoroughly with the hand mixer.

  • Add dry ingredients, mixing them in with the mixer. Fold in the parsnips and walnuts.

  • Prepare a 6-inch cake pan or a springform. If using a cake pan, cover with parchment paper. If using a springform, generously grease with olive or coconut oil.

  • Spoon 1/3 of the batter at a time into the pan/form and bake for 35-40 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Repeat with the remaining batter. You can also bake two 8-inch cakes if you don’t have a 6-inch pan or even bake all the batter at once like a thick cake (you may need to increase the baking time in this case) and then cut the cake into layers horizontally. Make sure that the cakes are completely cool before cutting or frosting them.

  • Garnish with candied kumquats on top and let the cake rest in the fridge for a couple of hours or overnight. Slice and serve with more candied kumquats.

I should concede that I’m not exceptionally gifted with regards to legitimate cake making. I could educate you regarding a few calamities, similar to when my cake unexplainably detonated all around the fridge, or that other time when the cake fell on the floor right as I opened the cooler entryway, or I could specify large numbers of my multifaceted cake manifestations that tragically inclined aside like the Tower of Pisa, or about the wonderful pink icing (Paloma’s birthday demand) that stained and became earthy colored just prior to serving. Each time these sorts of things occur, I promise to at no point ever make cake in the future however never adhere to my goals. What’s more, every time a cake I make really comes out well, I view it as enough motivation to celebrate and dive right in.
Carrot cake is the dear of the cake world, what’s not to cherish? It’s a work of art and basic. Yet, what about parsnips, the carrot’s pale-skinned person cousins that appear among other good winter root veggies this season? I grew up eating on crude parsnips right from the nursery, and they were a compulsory fixing in my mother’s renowned borsch. I likewise love a decent parsnip crush as a side dish to anything. This time the parsnips went into a sweet – a genuinely basic cake finished off with home sugar-coated kumquats.
I find the candied kumquats essential to experience the full flavor of this cake. If you can’t find kumquats, substitute with Meyer lemons, sour oranges, or any other candied citrus. This was my very first time working with kumquats, and I can attest to their perfect balance of sweet, sour, and orangey notes that make for a beautiful cake topping or marmalade. And take a look at more kumquat recipes over at my latest food blog crush, Princess Tofu
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Candied Kumquats

¾ cup honey
½ cup water
1 vanilla bean – seeds scraped out
2 pints (about 4 cups) of kumquats – sliced

In a small to medium saucepan, combine honey with water, vanilla seeds, and bean, and bring to a gentle boil. Add in the kumquats and bring back to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Cool down and keep the kumquats in the syrup, refrigerated.

Vegan Cream Cheese Frosting

2 packages of plain Tofutti cream cheese
fat from 1 can of full-fat unsweetened Thai coconut milk
3 tablespoons honey
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
generous squeeze of lemon juice

Place the can of coconut milk in the refrigerator overnight. The fat and water should separate and fat should accumulate on top. Carefully scoop it out and combine it with the rest of the ingredients in a medium-sized mixing bowl. Beat it with a hand mixer until well combined and fluffy. Keep refrigerated while baking the cake.

Gluten-Free and Vegan Parsnip Cake

¾ cup unsweetened almond milk
¼ cup ground chia seeds or flax seeds
¾ cup (105 g) buckwheat flour
¾ cup (90 g) millet flour
¾ cup (90 g) tapioca flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
½ teaspoon nutmeg
¾ cup coconut sugar
1 cup olive oil
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
zest of 1 orange
¼ cup freshly squeezed orange juice
about 3 cups of grated parsnips
1 ½ cups walnuts or pecans – chopped

1. preheat the oven to 350 F (180 C). Bring almond milk to a boil, and mix with ground chia in a large mixing bowl. Let the mixture sit for about 5 minutes.
2. Combine all the flours, baking powder and soda, salt, and spices in a mixing bowl, and set aside.
3. Add sugar to the milk-chia mixture and mix using a hand mixer. Continue by adding olive oil and vanilla extract, then orange zest and juice. Mix to combine thoroughly with a hand mixer.
4. Add dry ingredients into the wet, mixing them in with the mixer.
5. Fold in the parsnips and walnuts.
6. Prepare a 6-inch cake pan or a springform. If using a cake pan, cover it with parchment paper. I used a springform, and generously grease it with olive or coconut oil.
7. Spoon ⅓ of the batter at a time into the pan/form and bake for 35-40 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Repeat with the other two-thirds. You can also bake two 8-inch cakes if you don’t have a 6-inch pan, or even bake all the batter at once like a thick cake (you may need to increase the baking time in this case) and then cut the cake into layers horizontally. Make sure that the cakes are completely cool before cutting or frosting them.
8. Place one layer of the cake onto a cake stand or plate. Generously cover with a layer of cream cheese frosting and a thin layer of candied kumquats. Carefully place a second layer of the cake on top followed by another frosting and kumquat layer. Finish with the third cake layer and frost the entire cake.
9. Garnish with candied kumquats and let the cake rest in the fridge for a couple of hours or overnight. Slice and serve with more candied kumquats.

Note: Candied citrus is essential to the flavor of this cake. If you can’t

 

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